Gary Drostle

About me – A potted history

The early years

So starting at the beginning, I was lucky enough to be born in Woolwich, in South East London, which is a great place, and if I ever want a career change I will become a tourist guide for Woolwich. Colouring in and sticking was always the only thing I was good at and soon I was heading off to study fine art, first at Camberwell, then St Martins and Hornsey Colleges of Art.

BP01.1

When I finished art college in 1985 I knew I wanted to work on the street, always thought I’d end up in the gutter :)))

I initially began working as a mural artist for a project for Haringey Hospitals and spent two years painting murals there. Following on from that project I founded Haringey Mural Workshop. At the same time I served on the executive of Haringey Arts Council for two years and worked closely with many different community groups.

The first major commission

Perhaps our best work as Haringey Mural Workshop, and my first major commission was in 1987 to paint a series of murals for Alexandra Palace – ‘The History of The Peoples Palace’. If you look carefully you can spot a portrait of Gary and the team in the mural.

about-me-a-potted-history-2

The first mosaic work

After the Mural Workshop disbanded I headed back to my own hood and formed a new group called Wallscapes initially working with the fab Belfast artist Ruth Priestley. Ruth and I took on our first mosaic commission from my parent’s attic, aren’t you impressed we got all the material for a 4m x 4metre mosaic up into the attic and then once it was made got it back down again… That first mosaic, ‘Sunburst – the light at the end of the tunnel’, commissioned by the London Borough of Islington, would turn out to be a turning point in my life.

Sunburst-the-light-at-the-end-of-the-tunnel-Mural

The Wallscapes Years

In 1990 artist and old St Martins colleague Rob Turner joined Wallscapes. Rob and I went on to work as Wallscapes for over ten years completing numerous public art projects across the UK, honing and refining our mosaic technique. In 2001 Rob and I decided we needed to go their our ways in order to explore and develop further our own work.

Below, Wallscapes project: The Wellingborough Wells designed by Rob Turner.

The Wellingborough Wells

Drostle Public Arts Ltd

Since 2000 I have built up a successful studio in south east London creating large scale site specific artworks to my own designs and occasionally collaborating with other artists.

De luci fish sculpture

A growing reputation

With over twenty-five years experience now under my belt and a mantlepiece full of awards my work is now in demand abroad too. Over the last few years I have gained international recognition for my mosaics, completing major commissions in Iowa, Chicago, California and Washington DC as well as work in Colombia and Chile. At home I continue to create major public artworks including commissions for TFL – Transport for London, Chester City Council, London Borough of Bexley, The Royal College of General Practitioners and many more.

Education and waving the flag for mosaic art…

All that experience and commitment has resulted in being elected as President of the British Association for Modern Mosaic and being a guest lecturer at the Chicago Mosaic School. I have also given keynote speeches at the London conference of the British Association and the San Francisco, Pheonix, San Diego, Austin and Chicago conferences of American mosaic makers and juried exhibitions.

…and looking for the missing link

Becoming interested in all things mosaic I began looking at the specific British heritage of mosaic art. Unfortunately it soon became apparent that there was precious little information on the more recent mosaic history in the UK. Many of the major mosaic studios operating through the Victorian era, some of which went through to the 1960’s and 70’s had disappeared without trace. So I was very happy to be one of the founders of the BAMM Andamento mosaic journal and be on the magazines editorial board to try and record this fascinating crafts history.

 

Well if you managed to get through that, perhaps you should subscribe to the blog and see where it all goes from here…

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Posted: April 28, 2015

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A day in the life